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All 5 Together

Opening Session

Keynote with Raj Patel

Checklist Manifesto for Electronic Resources: Getting Ready for the Fiscal Year

4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. EDT FRIDAY, April 1

Presented by

  • Lenore England, Digital Resources Librarian, University of Maryland University College
  • Li Fu, Digital Services Librarian, University of Maryland University College
  • Stephen Miller, Associate Provost, Library, University of Maryland University College

Need to organize how you prepare your current, new, upgraded, or deselected electronic resources for the new fiscal year? Learn how to innovatively apply the principles of The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right and prepare a checklist to manage the myriad of tasks involved in this process. As a simple, but effective tool, a checklist will help you to make priorities clearer and prompt people to function better as a team.

The following questions are being provided to help prompt and facilitate discussion(s) especially for those virtual conference participants who are attenting as part of a larger group.

  1. Based on the description of how to prepare checklists following the principles of The Checklist Manifesto, how would you use checklists at your library and in which functional areas?
  2. Why do you think The Checklist Manifesto became such a huge bestseller?
  3. What are the downsides to using checklists and are there functional areas in your library where you think you would not be able to apply The Checklist Manifesto principles ?

When Nontraditional is the Norm: Shifting the Instruction Paradigm for Adult Online Students

3:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. EDT FRIDAY, April 1

Presented by

  • Erin Brothen, Education Librarian, Walden University
  • Erika Bennett, Information Literacy & Instruction Librarian, Capella University
  • Kim Staley, Reference Librarian and Liaison to the School of Public Service Leadership, Capella University

Adult, online students may be invisible, but they are a potent force and will be for years to come. How much do we know about them, and do our instructional activities meet their needs? You ll learn some surprising truths about adult students in the digital realm, and learn how to apply the principles of andragogy to create effective library instruction materials for your adult, online students.

The following questions are being provided to help prompt and facilitate discussion(s) especially for those virtual conference participants who are attenting as part of a larger group.

  1. What is your library doing to increase students’ ability to find relevant library instruction media?
  2. What other accessibility or design issues have you seen with your students?

Listening to Users…. Closing the feedback loop: Just do it!

1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. EDT FRIDAY, April 1

Presented by

  • Meg Scharf, Associate Director for Public Services, University of Central Florida
  • Lisabeth Chabot, College Librarian, Ithaca College

Libraries can close the feedback loop quickly. Methods for realtime feedback and library responses, in use at a college library and a large university library, will be presented,including suggestion boxes and guestbooks, as well as usability studies, mystery shoppers, and informal student interviews. Often libraries focus on information-gathering rather than improvements and responses. If the response is not timely, "short attention span" customers may lose interest and feel as if their opinions do not count.

The following questions are being provided to help prompt and facilitate discussion(s) especially for those virtual conference participants who are attenting as part of a larger group.

  1. Tell the truth: does assessment seem like all pain and no gain? This is virtual Las Vegas; we won’t tell anyone.
  2. Does your library maintain a suggestion box? Electronic or print? How does your library respond to suggestions?
  3. Have you had a positive (or negative) experience with mystery shoppers?

Integrating the Library into Online Courses

12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. EDT FRIDAY, April 1

Presented by

  • Susan Thompson, Coordinator Library Systems, California State University San Marcos
  • Thoreau Lovell, Head of Library Information Technology & Media Services, Leonard Library, San Francisco State University
  • Hillary Kaplowitz, Instructional Designer, California State University, Northridge
  • Danielle Skaggs, Coordinator of Online Instructional Design, California State University, Northridge
  • Christina Mayberry, Science and Engineering Librarian, California State University, Northridge

What if you could bottle a little bit of the library into every online course? Libraries at three California State Universities are partnering with their campus IT departments to create a rich library environment in every instructor s course. Students can use library resources and services directly from within the online course container and librarians are provided with the power to take on an active role in online courses.

The following questions are being provided to help prompt and facilitate discussion(s) especially for those virtual conference participants who are attenting as part of a larger group.

  1. How has the advent of online courses, especially online-only courses, impacted your library’s ability to provide services and support to students and faculty?
  2. What library services and resources do you consider most important to offer from within an instructor’s online course container?

Humanities by the Numbers: Evaluating usage data of collection areas

10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. EDT FRIDAY, April 1

Presented by

  • Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Humanities Librarian, Miami University
  • Masha Misco, Catalog & Slavic Librarian, Miami University
  • Jeffrey Hartsell-Gundy, Miami University

This presentation describes a collection analysis project collaborated on by Public Services and Technical Services librarians. Collection areas were examined by call number ranges to determine the size and nature of our collections, how often call numbers circulate, and how frequently materials that come on approval are used versus items purchased with discretionary funds. We describe the methodology used and report on trends that emerged from the analyzed usage statistics.

The following questions are being provided to help prompt and facilitate discussion(s) especially for those virtual conference participants who are attenting as part of a larger group.

  1. Could you think of projects at your institution that could benefit from this type of data gathering and analysis?
  2. If you wanted to gather usage statistics, what kinds of research questions would you ask?
  3. Can you think of other possible alternatives to gather and analyze this type of data?

Harnessing Your Projects: Using Project Managment Techniques and Basecamp in Libraries

9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. EDT FRIDAY, April 1

Presented by

  • Barbara Lewis, Coordinator for Digital Collections, University of South Florida

Libraries are full of projects. There are renovations, serials reviews, digitizations, system implementations, and new websites to name a few. This interactive program is focused on effective project management. It begins with an overview of project management techniques and how they are applicable to libraries and ends with a demonstration of Basecamp, a leading online project collaboration tool. Includes hands on exercises using Basecamp and examples of how the University of South Florida uses Basecamp.

The following questions are being provided to help prompt and facilitate discussion(s) especially for those virtual conference participants who are attenting as part of a larger group.

  1. How much time does it take to manage a project?
  2. Is there much training required to be a project manager?
  3. Is Basecamp free?
  4. How do you justify the cost of project management software?
  5. Why not just use Outlook and/or Google tools?

Digital Library Interdependence: Building external partnerships with cultural heritage organizations

4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. EDT THURSDAY, March 31

Presented by

  • Darren Poley, Outreach Librarian, Villanova University

How one academic library has groomed external relations with others outside its university to allow the rich cultural resources they own and manage to be preserved digitally and made available to scholars world-wide by means of a substantial digital library. 2011 marks the fifth year of this University s digital library and the announcement of the fifth major digital library partnership agreement, undertaking now to digitize another university’s world-class special collection of early printed bibles.

The following questions are being provided to help prompt and facilitate discussion(s) especially for those virtual conference participants who are attenting as part of a larger group.

  1. I’m interested in building a trusted digital repository. Should I start my own digital collection or should I form a partnership with other institution(s)?
  2. I wish to form a digital partnership. What are the factors that will contribute to a successful partnership? What common goals and values do I and my partner share? Do I understand the legal and ownership issues that come with a digital partnership?
  3. I wish to create my own digital collection. Am I fully aware of the costs associated with hosting my own digital collection? Should I go with a vendor solution or an open-source software solution? Do I understand the workflow involved in hosting and an managing my own digital solution?